Under the Skin Review — Written 4/18/14

     Oh my God. I was always excited for this film, but this is just above and beyond what I could have imagined. This film is not for everyone because it’s so incredibly arthouse, but I honestly think that if people talked about the film, they’d see it in a new light.

     Virtually nothing here is meant to be taken literally; it’s extremely symbolic. It’s an allegorical trip that is haunting, intriguing, sublime, gorgeous, sad, different, strange, human, spellbinding, unforgettable, and masterful, utilizing all of these qualities that convey what it means to be a human. What is also is about, though, is reveling in the questions and finding answers.

     The cinematography is immaculate and the sound design is incredible. The score is mesmerizing and perfectly complements the visuals and tone of the film, with its strings and screechy sounds crossing into the realm of being sound effects at some points, and that’s great because like the film, it brings together all senses and experiences into one odd package. Scarlett Johansson is intoxicating, doing so much with so little dialogue. She uses her eyes and facial expressions and callousness-turned-fake-charm so well, and you forget that you’re watching an actress work because it’s so immersive and shockingly realistic.

     I can see why some people would dislike this film because it is very alienating (no pun intended) and probably as far from mainstream as you can get, but it’s also so engrossing. This is a film that gives no explanations and doesn’t really have much of a setup that leads into a conflict that sets the movie into action in a traditional sense. It works wonderfully because the movie itself feeds off of our abilities — as humans — to interpret emotions and read other individuals. The movie even seems to be watching you back at times.

     Jonathan Glazer demonstrates that he has such a huge talent but also a great deal of discipline in order to make everything work. In the hands of another director, everything would have crumbled into pieces, but because it’s so well-made, he makes connections between humanity and sexuality, objectification and death, and, to a certain extent, gender roles.

     The ending (without spoiling anything) both satisfies and leaves ample room for interpretation, and is very affecting. There is a good amount of emotion to this film, and it’s just so commendable that a film like this could be so human and realistic. I can definitely see the comparisons to Kubrick (my favorite director ever) and I could compare this film to Eraserhead and 2001: A Space Odyssey, and partially to Eyes Wide Shut.

     This is a movie that I will never be able to forgot, and I know for a fact that I’ll be thinking about it obsessively for a very long time. This may be one of my favorite films ever.

     9.7/10, masterful, two thumbs up, miles above average, etc.

daftpunkforcutie:

what the fuck this turtle has like no games on it

daftpunkforcutie:

what the fuck this turtle has like no games on it

holy-dildo:

death noot

holy-dildo:

death noot

screamtrilogy:

3 years ago today, Scream 4 was released! Happy anniversary! April 15th 2011.

screamtrilogy:

3 years ago today, Scream 4 was released! Happy anniversary! April 15th 2011.

screamtrilogy:

3 years ago today, Scream 4 was released in theaters.

screamtrilogy:

3 years ago today, Scream 4 was released in theaters.

Happy 3rd Birthday SCREAM 4!

Happy birthday, Scream 4! I remember seeing this opening night, which I’m happy to say was actually my best theatrical experience I’ve ever had.

Within the first seven minutes the film brings meta-humor and self-deprecation to a new level, pointing out all of the supposed flaws that anyone could complain about and opening addresses itself with, “It’s been done to death… Stick a fork in 1996 already.” The dialogue is witty and acerbic the entire time and all feels fresh and modern, which in itself is a huge accomplishment.

Characters are completely believable as teens and the acting is actually great, specifically Hayden Panettiere who plays my favorite character: a dry, sardonic and sexy closeted film geek. The brilliantly orchestrated final act discusses modern society’s obsession with technology and easy-found fame and the identity of the killer surprised me to no end; even being a die hard fan of the franchise and a cinephile, I didn’t guess anything correctly. There are SO many red herrings that make you contemplate if something is too obvious, who was doing what when, and makes you double check yourself in regards to reverse psychology of believing who the killer is.

The best part is that all but one of the clichés and tropes that are utilized for satire are subverted and/or openly acknowledged. The script justifies a character’s seemingly stupid actions or flips it outright. Everything is shot well with good use of lighting as well as a good orchestral score and the directing is good (pay attention to the increasing corniness of the opening scene).

It’s actually the best of the series, better than the first with very clever kills and witty satire regarding torture porn, found footage genre films, modern horror, remakes and reboots. And yes, it scared the crap out of me. 9.5/10, incredible, two thumbs up, etc.

Happy birthday, Scream 4! I remember seeing this opening night, which I’m happy to say was actually my best theatrical experience I’ve ever had.

Within the first seven minutes the film brings meta-humor and self-deprecation to a new level, pointing out all of the supposed flaws that anyone could complain about and opening addresses itself with, “It’s been done to death… Stick a fork in 1996 already.” The dialogue is witty and acerbic the entire time and all feels fresh and modern, which in itself is a huge accomplishment.

Characters are completely believable as teens and the acting is actually great, specifically Hayden Panettiere who plays my favorite character: a dry, sardonic and sexy closeted film geek. The brilliantly orchestrated final act discusses modern society’s obsession with technology and easy-found fame and the identity of the killer surprised me to no end; even being a die hard fan of the franchise and a cinephile, I didn’t guess anything correctly. There are SO many red herrings that make you contemplate if something is too obvious, who was doing what when, and makes you double check yourself in regards to reverse psychology of believing who the killer is.

The best part is that all but one of the clichés and tropes that are utilized for satire are subverted and/or openly acknowledged. The script justifies a character’s seemingly stupid actions or flips it outright. Everything is shot well with good use of lighting as well as a good orchestral score and the directing is good (pay attention to the increasing corniness of the opening scene).

It’s actually the best of the series, better than the first with very clever kills and witty satire regarding torture porn, found footage genre films, modern horror, remakes and reboots. And yes, it scared the crap out of me. 9.5/10, incredible, two thumbs up, etc.

niknak79:

One of the teachers was absent for photo day: they improvised

niknak79:

One of the teachers was absent for photo day: they improvised

stopthisgirl:

When you’re talking shit about someone then they walk past you

misscinemafanatic:

SHE F*CKING GLANCES DOWN!

The secret references of Disney and Pixar…..

OOOOOOOOHHHHHHH MY GOD. What a time to be a teenager, right? American Airlines responds to her fake threat and then she flips her shit like what she did was hilarious and says, 

"I always wanted to be famous, but I meant like Demi Lovato famous, not Osama bin laden famous"

It’s 100% a love story. The best love stories are the ones where they don’t end up together. We very deliberately tried to make it like a love story. She has girl, she loses girl, she tries to win girl back. Just trying to make it feel like it was existing within the tropes of a romantic love story, then letting the reins go. It’s sad. That’s my favorite feeling in movies, that ache.

Greta Gerwig, on Frances/Sophie’s relationship