proctalgia:

when u try to tell ur friends a pun

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yaaaas scream 4 yaaaas

The Trip to Italy Review — Written 8/28/14

     I’ve watched the first Trip three times on Netflix, and the most recent time, I realized how much heart and character it has. The characterization isn’t overstated, the interactions are very realistic, and the gags work about 95% of the time. This sequel is still very funny and realistic with heart, but it just seems to have diminished a bit.

     It’s very funny and rather well-paced, but the novelty seems to have faded just a tiny, tiny bit. Full disclosure, I did really like the film. You could say that I loved it. Coogan and Brydon are hilarious and have amazing chemistry, and can still combine overt comedy with more nuanced gags. They have an interesting role reversal throughout which differentiates it from its predecessor, which plays into this movie having more plot than the first.

     I do appreciate it, but there’s a subplot concerning Rob Brydon that doesn’t completely work. (Reminder: it’s still very funny and lots of fun). The only problem that keeps me from loving me as much as the first is that they feared that the novelty would wear off so they tried something different, and with that, they cut back on the comedy a tad.

     I described the first film as “hysterical,” whereas this one is “really, really funny.” EDIT: I liked this more upon another viewing, since I caught onto more subtleties and was more prepared for its tone and subplots that are more than the first.

     8.6/10, great, (almost) two thumbs up, above average, etc.

The Hundred-Foot Journey Review — Written 8/26/14

     I only saw this for two reasons: the theater that I work at was playing it so I could see it for free, and two of my friends were interested in this (but they didn’t like it). In a nutshell, this is basically bland comfort food for your grandmother. It’s kind of interesting how unremarkable this is

     Everything from the characters to the dialogue to the plot (every thread of it) is so clichéd that it comes off as a more culturally-diverse two-hour episode of Full House. The comic relief throughout is lame and unfunny, while the actual dramatic moments are unintentionally funny and awkwardly staged. If you like tired plots and absolutely nothing new, then you might like this, but it’ll also help if you’re within the target demographic. (However, there was an elderly couple in my showing that left because they were bored and uninterested.)

     And speaking of which, this movie is 122 minutes long, which is about 75 to 100 minutes too long, because, again, this is like a Lifetime movie or a Full House episode given how unoriginal and awkward it is to watch, and Helen Mirren doesn’t even do much. The most entertainment I got from this was laughing at it with the people that I saw it with, but even after 85 minutes, they were bugging me to leave with them (and they were interested in seeing it).

     4/10, bad, two thumbs up, far below average, etc.

andreafluff:

instadayum:

kamikaze95:

nowyoukno:

Remember IT IS NOT A WOMAN’S RESPONSIBILITY TO PREVENT RAPE. In the world we live in, however, women should be empowered with any tools in order to protect themselves. Source for more facts follow NowYouKno

:-))

i think the best but also saddest thing about this is that MEN created this product to protect women from MEN

Preach.

andreafluff:

instadayum:

kamikaze95:

nowyoukno:

Remember IT IS NOT A WOMAN’S RESPONSIBILITY TO PREVENT RAPE. In the world we live in, however, women should be empowered with any tools in order to protect themselves. Source for more facts follow NowYouKno

:-))

i think the best but also saddest thing about this is that MEN created this product to protect women from MEN

Preach.

Emma Watson captured her personality perfectly.

THIS SHOW

THIS SHOW

shitharington:

 Pretty Wild S:1 E:6

Rob Brydon is like a thinner Nick Frost.

If I Stay Review — Written 8/25/14

     I’m not the target audience for this movie, but I love Chloë Grace Moretz, and she’s really the best part of this movie. Like her other performances, she’s grounded and realistic and not going, “Oh, look how adorable I am,” (even though she is) so she helps this for a bit, but she can’t keep this afloat forever.

     This is 106 minutes, which is a comfortable runtime for any movie, but the characters have the same conversations multiple times and it really starts to wear on you. They talk about going to Juilliard at least five times and it gets pretty annoying. Even though the supernatural element here is a bit interesting, it all gets boring after about 50 minutes, which seems to be mostly due to the direction.

     The characters are fine; they aren’t detestable but might come off as annoying (don’t drive on mountain roads on a snow day because you WILL get in a car accident, duh), but carry the story along enough more the most part. However, the movie gets to be really manipulative as opposed to genuinely affecting, just throwing the saddest stuff at the screen. It doesn’t come off as cynical or anything, but it just doesn’t work. And side note: Jamie Blackley is six years older than Moretz, which is distracting and kind of creepy given that she’s a minor in real life and he’s an adult.

     4.8/10, lame, two thumbs down, below average, etc.

Calvary Review — Written 8/22/14

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     Billing this as a black comedy almost does this film a disservice. Sure, there is dark humor laced here and there, but it’s very brisk and never really dwelled on, and that helps this be one of the bleakest movies of the year, striking a chord almost like The Rover did earlier this year.

     The film is successful as a whodunnit, but that isn’t its main focus. As we see these townspeople and their lives, the attention isn’t on whether or not we suspect them of conspiracy to commit murder, but we instead peek into their character and ask ourselves how much we could forgive each and every one of them, almost out of empathetic pity. The film’s message is brave — more or less that forgiveness could be called overrated — but very true, whether you want to admit it or not. Its tone and nearly-fully-overcast color palette compliment this as well.

     Brendan Gleeson is terrific, and witnessing his sort of (de)evolution as this character is almost magical in an odd way, given how effortlessly he slips into character. You forget that you’re watching someone act, and that’s something I almost never say. His character acts as a parallel to Jesus Christ, and while it doesn’t carry any specific religious perspectives, the themes that he helps carry are fascinating.

     I could see myself thinking about this movie longer than I would most other films. It has the ingredients of being a slow-burn film: the sense of relaxation you get watching it just because it feels like watching life unfold, the landscapes and colors, and the fact that I’m getting more out of this movie by writing about it after seeing it.

     8.7/10, terrific, two thumbs up, far above average, etc.